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ATL
Digi

Atlanta
Digital

 

Nearly three-quarters (74%) of American workers are moderately or highly concerned about their workplace well-being, reveals a new study by the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) and Greenwald Research. Nearly three-quarters of the workers also reported a similar level of concern about their emotional well-being or mental health and a quarter rate their mental health as fair or poor, according to the 2023 Workplace Wellness Survey.

The fourth annual Workplace Wellness Survey examined worker attitudes towards employment-based benefits in the workplace, as well as a broad spectrum of financial well-being, employment-based health insurance and retirement benefit issues.

“What we found surprising is that this is the first year that saving for retirement is not the primary financial stress factor for employees. Instead, we found that day-to-day issues like emergency savings and paying for household bills are top of mind for workers,” said Jake Spiegel, research associate, Health and Wealth Benefits, EBRI.

Workplace Well-Being
(Photo: Adobe Stock / Yuliia)

 

The 2023 survey revealed that:

  • One in three (29%) American workers are highly concerned about their own workplace well-being, while another 44% are moderately concerned. Approximately one quarter (26%) of American workers are not too or not at all concerned.
  • A third of American workers report that they are highly concerned about their emotional well-being or mental health and a quarter rate their mental health as fair or poor.

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  • American workers are worried about how potential economic challenges will impact their finances. More than four out of five American workers are at least somewhat concerned that there will be a recession in the next year or that inflation will remain high for at the next 12 months.
  • Four in 10 workers feel at least somewhat prepared to handle an emergency expense of $5,000. Far more American workers (70%) feel equipped to manage an unexpected expense of $500.
  • More than half of workers feel mental health benefits have become more important to offer in the past year and four in 10 feel the same way about financial wellness programs.
  • Nearly six in 10 American workers struggle to balance work and caregiving responsibilities. Among caregivers assisting with activities of daily living or instrumental activities of daily living, three in four struggle to find balance.
  • Six in 10 employees do not feel financially prepared for being unable to work or reducing work hours to provide care. Caregivers are more likely to feel unprepared (64% vs. 56%).
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